Blood Donation

Did you know that every 2 seconds someone in the United States needs blood?

On December 31, 1969, President Nixon designated January as National Blood Donors Month. The goal of this proclamation was to bring awareness and support for the voluntary donation of blood. Many blood banks run short of supply following the holidays which impacts local hospitals in their ability to provide life-saving treatments. There are many organizations actively collaborating on how to best support routine blood donation from communities.

Blood Donation Tips

The COVID-19 pandemic helped to raise awareness of donation of whole blood, plasma, and platelet donations. Shortages revealed the need for varying not just the donation type but the varying types of blood. While there are limitations on who can receive what blood, no matter the blood type (A, AB, B, and O), the donation is needed. This is also true for Rh factors (+ or -); your blood can save a life.

Blood Type

Growing and Serving more communities in 2023

Elite Home Health & Hospice is committed to serving the communities of the Lewiston/Clarkston valley, Moscow, and Orofino. We have been able to expand our services and support patients as far as Kooskia and up into Potlatch in 2022. We grew by adding in palliative services in April of 2022. Our growth is not going to stop in 2023. We plan to launch with home health services in Craigmont and Winchester in early 2023 and expand services by the end of the year.

This endeavor means that we are looking at what makes Elite an employer of choice within our communities. We believe that within the jobs that we create to support these communities we are employing individuals with a mission to provide “life-changing service.” Home Health, Palliative and Hospice services are also opportunities for individuals to pursue work-life balance with a flexible schedule, competitive wages and benefits, and a work culture that is supportive. Our core values of CAPLICO are a driving force for how and who we are.

C – Customer Second

A – Accountability

P – Passion for Learning

L – Love One Another

I – Intelligent Risk Taking

C – Celebration

O – Ownership

WE are regularly reviewing our areas of service and how to better meet those needs. If you are a nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech-language pathologist, registered dietitian, social worker, or nurses’ aide, we would love the opportunity to speak with you about your goals and aspirations. Our home health and hospice programs are always growing. We know the needs of our community are great. If you are a provider (a physician or nurse practitioner), we would love to speak with you about ways that you can participate in Elite’s unique mission to provide “life-changing service” in hospice and palliative care.

2023 is going to be a great year. We are so excited to have you join us!

Senior Health Fair at the Elk’s

Join Elite Home Health & Hospice in partnership with the Lewiston Elks Lodge No. 896

Together, we proudly present the 2022 LC Valley Senior Health Fair.

This event takes place on Wednesday, September 14, 3:00 – 6:00pm at the Lewiston Elks Lodge, 3444 Country Club Drive, Lewiston.

During the event there will be senior health screenings, senior health related vendors and presentations, plus refreshments and a giveaway.

The event is open to the community and FREE of charge. For more information or to RSVP 509-758-2568.

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

The National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) is an opportunity to learn and better understand the role of vaccines in your healthcare plan. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, this annual observance highlights the importance of getting recommended vaccines throughout your life. The COVID 19 pandemic has impacted all aspects of life. There have been known challenges with patients’ ability to attend important appointments and receive routine vaccinations. There has been significant questions raised about vaccines and how they work which has created delays in how people are accessing and scheduling immunizations.

During NIAM, we encourage you to talk to your doctor, nurse or healthcare provider to ensure you and your family are protected against serious diseases by getting caught up on routine vaccination. If you have questions, ask your provider. If you are on our home health, palliative, or hospice services, ask one of your clinicians for information and resources.

June is Myasthenia Gravis Awareness

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that affects the muscle, specifically resulting in fluctuations in strength with worsening upon exertion and improvement with rest. This feature is critical in the management of the disease and directs rehabilitative efforts to support functional recovery and optimize return to muscle function. Exercise-based interventions have been assessed on individuals with motoneuron disease, peripheral nerve disease, neuromuscular transmission disease, and muscle disease (Cun et al, 2007).  Critically, interventions that targeted specific muscle groups by implementing strategic exercises and modalities resulting in improvement in bodily functions, activities, and participation as defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) (Cun et al., 2007). Therefore, addressing disease which impact the neuromuscular junction may consider the role of rehabilitative professionals in physical and occupational therapy to optimize recovery according to the ICF model (Cun et al., 2007).  Exercises that have proven most impactful include a combination of aerobic and resistance training (Westerberg et al., 2018).  Additional research is needed to investigate the benefits of modalities, such as ultrasound. However, the measurements for success in treatment reviewed elements of fall risk and safety in transferring positions (Westerberg et al., 2018). Myasthenia gravis is a disease process with 5 main classifications which identify specific areas of the body most affected (Trouth et al., 2012).  While classes 3 and 4 may most benefit from physical and occupational therapy, classes affecting oropharyngeal and respiratory muscles, 2 and 5, may benefit from speech pathology to aid in strategies for safe swallowing (Trouth et al., 2012). The role of therapy in supporting functional outcomes is critical in any phase of myasthenia gravis which impacts the patient’s ability to engage in activities of daily living.  

For more information, read the following articles:

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ad/2012/874680/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081147/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0003999307014517

June is Aphasia Awareness

Aphasia is an acquired language disorder that is relatively unknown in the general population. Speech and language therapy are often prescribed by physicians and incorporate the unique skills and training of speech-language pathologists in the rehabilitative realm (Doogan et al., 2018). Beyond the actual presence of aphasia, the severity and clinical complexity impact the patient’s outcomes and the overall prognosis for language recovery. The highest negative relationship is related to any underlying neurological condition, such as dementia, and global illnesses, such as cancer (Doogan et al., 2018).  The amount of therapy a patient has access to is directly related to the outcomes observed such that higher doses of treatment result in better outcomes, holding all things equal (Doogan et al., 2018).  Timing of intervention and the patient’s baseline prior to the event causing aphasia, such as stroke or brain injury, are also critical pieces to determining recovery (Ali et al., 2021). Essentially, access to early intervention is critical for outcomes from the hospital phase into rehabilitation where dosage of intervention then becomes the next critical element (Ali et al., 2021).  Further, the components of language that are recovered are dependent on the intensity of stimulation to the respective region of the brain (Stefaniak et al., 2022).  The unique role of speech language pathologists in this recovery is in understanding the specific area of the brain affected and its connection to the language system. Treatment is then created to target stimulation to this area (Stefaniak et al., 2022).  The role of respective therapists in this space is in the sharing of treatment strategies and carryover to support recovery. Aphasia is a condition that impacts quality of life to a level that creates isolation and can have significant impact on a patient’s mood. Effective treatment is not only critical but essential for a return to social engagement and overall quality of life.

For more information, check out…

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11910-018-0891-x

https://academic.oup.com/brain/article/145/4/1354/6546042?login=true

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.031162

Weekly Pulse for May 30, 2022

Home Health
(Therapy)
Start Date
Hospice
(Nursing)
Start Date
Clarkston5/315/30
Lewiston5/315/30
Moscow6/15/31
Orofino6/15/31
***Start Dates are contingent on receiving a complete referral***

Clinical Focus

Thank you for joining us this month on our journey exploring asthma and allergy awareness, the importance of air quality and its impact on our respiration, lessening the stigma of mental illness in our practice and outreach to patients, optimizing treatments for osteoporosis and arthritis management, and creating frameworks for patient’s understanding of stroke risk. We also had the opportunity to recognize the work of our speech-language pathologists, nurses, and administrative professionals. Thank you for joining us!

Question Corner

What does an occupational therapy assessment look like?

Of all the professions involved in home health services, occupational therapy is the one that is uniquely trained for assessing patients’ capacity for optimal living in their home setting. Occupational therapists complete a comprehensive health history review, as well as a medication review, to identify the health related obstacles. They then engage in a review of the patient’s necessary and chosen activities. They assess how the patient is completing these tasks and the obstacles the patient is encountering in completing each of the components. They will then perform a physical assessment to review the patient’s capacity for movements and the bodily limitations that may impede certain positions and actions. They will review adaptations already in place and assess the effectiveness. They will assess the environment to identify the setup that best optimizes the setting or hinders a chosen activity. They will assess the patient’s learning style to identify changes in cognition and supportive systems for learning and using new processes. They will engage in a psychosocial review to identify support systems and involved parties. They then collaborate with the patient and family to identify treatment targets and create a plan of care. The certified occupational therapy assistant may lead some treatment sessions in collaboration with the occupational therapist during the home health course. If you have questions about occupational therapy and home health, reach out to us at info@EliteHHH.com

People to know

Clarkston Liaison/Lifeline – Angie (509) 780-8097

Lewiston Liaison – Beth (509) 254-1381

Moscow & Orofino Liaison – Scott (509) 234-3102

Business Development – Ashley (509) 843-7605

May is Stroke Awareness Month!

Rehabilitation in stroke recovery engages in multiple approaches for neurological remapping. This approach is dependent on the brain’s ongoing plasticity despite insult. The evidence for these rehabilitative approaches lies in activity-dependent changes in the brain (Braun, et al., 2021). Research is actively exploring the role of dose in recovery with stroke. This discussion becomes critical when advocating for ongoing patient-directed interventions, such as rehabilitative services. Identifying the right frequency of visits and the right duration of practice for a particular skill set to engage neurological remapping is critical in achieving results (Hayward, et al., 2021). Professionals in physical therapy, speech-language pathology, and occupational therapy are engaged in this dynamic when addressing motor challenges and rehabilitating individuals at the various phases of recovery often driving the changes in placement and therapy access (Hayward, et al., 2021). The continuum of service delivery from the acute care setting through skilled nursing and home health are directed by anticipated improvements given treatment at a specified dosage (Braun, et al., 2021). The complexities of this recovery are becoming increasingly diverse with considerations related to pharmacological intervention and timing, nutritional intake and management, and inflammatory responses in the system that impact recovery (Couch, et al., 2021). The reality for recovery from stroke is the complex approach employed by multiple professionals who engage in the rehabilitative process.

Home health services are often a supportive step in the transition home for many patients who have experienced stroke. Efforts in creating modifications and setting-up the home environment are a focus at this phase and often involve a different skill set from those in the acute care hospital setting or rehabilitative skilled nursing setting. We encourage our rehabilitative professionals to train and employ these unique skills to optimize outcomes for our patients recovering from stroke.

Resources for stroke awareness include:

https://www.sophe.org/

https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/communications_kit.htm

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/News-Events/Events-Proceedings/Events/Stroke-Awareness-Month

https://www.stroke.org/en/about-the-american-stroke-association

https://www.hap.org/blog/2021/05/may-is-national-stroke-awareness-month

Recovery from stroke is a long process, likened often to a marathon. The role of healthcare professionals in the rehabilitative space is to continue building and supporting the optimal exercises and environment to gain returns. While progress can feel limited in the later phases, understanding that stroke recovery is ongoing after the acute stage is critical for families and patients in pursuing the right resources. Professionals in rehabilitation are able to support strategic goals within the home setting to aid patient’s participation in life tasks of choice. Ask us how we can help your patients at the various phases of recovery to support their daily living.

Weekly Pulse for May 23, 2022

Home Health
(Therapy)
Start Date
Hospice
(Nursing)
Start Date
Clarkston5/315/30
Lewiston5/315/30
Moscow6/15/31
Orofino6/15/31
***Start Dates are contingent on receiving a complete referral***

Clinical Focus

This week we have the opportunity to acknowledge the work of the team behind the scenes at Elite Home Health & Hospice. Our office staff manages everything from the supplies we need to the communications with all of our community partners. These individuals handle incoming calls and requests by phone, fax, and mail; they process referrals to have a patient seen as soon as possible; they coordinate therapists and nurses to meet the patient needs; they collaborate with local physician offices, hospitals, and specialists to collect all the necessary treatment information for the clinical team to build a plan, and they meet with families who have questions about home health, palliative, and hospice services. The operations of Elite Home Health & Hospice is built on the hard work of a team of local office staff. We would not be able to deliver life changing service without each and every one of them!

Question Corner

What does intake for home health and hospice entail?

Elite Home Health & Hospice currently receives referrals by fax or hand delivery. An intake coordinator will review the packet to assure all the necessary documents are included. If anything is missing, the liaison will reach out to local physicians/hospitals for the information to meet the Medicare requirements. For home health, the intake coordinator will then call the patient to let them know the services that have been ordered and the start date of those services. For hospice, the intake coordinator will reach out to the clinical liaison to communicate with the patient and family about any questions or concerns they have regarding hospice services; this often results in an in-person informational to support the patient and the family. A clinical review of the referral is completed to assure all the Medicare requirements are met. Communication with providers for additional information often occurs to support the referral. The patient and family are then called to share the appointment date and the nurse that will guide them through the process. If you have questions about accessing home health or hospice services, reach out to us at info@EliteHHH.com  

People to know

Clarkston Liaison/Lifeline – Angie (509) 780-8097

Lewiston Liaison – Beth (509) 254-1381

Moscow & Orofino Liaison – Scott (509) 234-3102

Business Development – Ashley (509) 843-7605